CSL-Behring conducting stroke clinical trial

2nd August 2012

Stroke is among the three leading causes of death worldwide and the most frequent cause of permanent disability. Our paper in 2007 (reference below) suggested that Immunoglobulin given intravenously to mice could protect the brain against experimental stroke by preventing complement-mediated neuronal cell death. That study is now being translated into human volunteers in a clinical trial starting this week.

Arumugam, T.V.; Tang, S.-C.; Lathia, J. D.; Cheng, A.; Mughal, M. R.;Chigurupati,S.; Magnus, T.; Chan, S.L.; Jo, D-G.; Ouyang, X.; Fairlie, D.P.; Granger, D. N.; Vortmeyer, A.; Basta, M.; Mattson, M.P. Intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) protects the brain against experimental stroke by preventing complement-mediated neuronal cell death. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. (USA)  2007104, 14104-14109.

 

http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01628055

Fairlie Group Home Page: http://fairlie.imb.uq.edu.au

Scientists develop compounds that can halt arthritis spread

Scientists have developed experimental compounds that can block the process that leads to inflammation in the tissue, paving the way for treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases such as arthritis.

Researchers from University of Queensland have developed experimental compounds that block the stimulation process in which human enzymes, proteases increase the levels of immune cells leading to inflammation.

“Human enzymes called proteases stimulate the secretion of immune cells that, when the correct amount is released, play important roles in digestion, fighting infections and healing wounds,” Professor Fairlie from Queensland’s Institute for Molecular Bioscience said in a statement.

“But in chronic inflammatory diseases such as arthritis, these enzymes continuously stimulate the release of immune cells, which cause inflammation when present at high levels.

This leads to ongoing tissue damage,” Fairlie said.

Fairlie and his team have developed experimental compounds that block this stimulation and successfully reduce chronic inflammatory arthritis in experimental models.

The study was published in the Federation of American Societies For Experimental Biology Journal.

http://www.imb.uq.edu.au/index.html?page=182413&pid=12193

Fairlie Group Home Page: http://fairlie.imb.uq.edu.au